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storing marijuana seeds

Some people who live in regions where there is a lot of cannabis activism and reform are currently stockpiling seeds of their favourite strains to grow when it’s legal in the future. Whatever your reason may be for having seeds, remember that taking care of them is one of the most important things you can do for your harvest.

With the correct method of storage, cannabis seeds could remain viable for 5-10 years! Seed storage is important for many reasons. Someone who just created their own, high-quality genetics, may want to keep the seeds to reproduce the strain.

WHY IS PROPER SEED STORAGE NECESSARY

As mentioned above, seeds require cold temperatures so they don’t lose their essence. Either freezing or refrigeration will do. However, when keeping seeds in the refrigerator, keep them as far back as possible so they won’t be exposed to any temperature changes when the door is opened.

Frequent inquiries from new growers are often related to cannabis seeds. How can they be stored safely? How long will they last in storage? Will they retain the same qualities as newer seeds? When stored appropriately, yes, you can grow prime cannabis plants with decade-old seeds, just as you could with seeds that are only a few months old.

If only being stored for a few months, cannabis seeds should do fine in a grip-seal bag, placed in a mason jar or some other type of airtight container. For more long-term storage, a vacuum-sealed package is a much more popular option. Many seasoned seed-savers like to add a food-grade desiccant to their package as well.

Remember, modern fridges are very dry. It’s super important your seeds aren’t directly exposed to these conditions, as the lack of humidity can cause them to use up their nutrient stores just to stay alive.

The ridge is the slightly elevated side of your seed. Like other parts of the shell, this ridge can become extra tough over time. Removing it gently with a sharp Stanley blade can help your seed sprout.

Before germinating your old seeds, try soaking them in carbonated water enriched with fulvic acid, germination booster, hydrogen peroxide, or gibberellic acid. For best results, use room temperature water and soak your seeds for 12 hours in a dark place.

EFFECTS OF HUMIDITY ON CANNABIS SEEDS

When you’re ready to germinate your seeds, inspect them and germinate any seeds with damage to the outer shell first. The outer shell of your seeds is designed to protect the volatile genetics inside. Seeds with cracks in the outer shell are a lot more vulnerable and shouldn’t be stored.

For short-term storage, a dark cupboard or drawer with stable temperatures is usually fine. Try to keep your seeds out of areas of your house that are susceptible to the natural temperature changes of your local environment.

Older seeds often have an extra tough outer shell. Gently scratching this shell with some sandpaper can help moisture and warmth enter your seed at the time of germination. Try gently scarring your old cannabis seeds just before soaking to help them sprout.

We’ve all found an odd seed somewhere at the bottom of an old drawer or cupboard. Here are a few tips on how to germinate old cannabis seeds:

To keep humidity low, it is ideal to have some sealable containers on hand. To do this, a highly recommended option is to use Eppendorf tubes, a standard piece of laboratory equipment used for the preservation of liquid samples, and the very ones in which we provide our customers with our seeds.

These are small cylindrical containers with conical bottoms, made of polypropylene, and with hermetic seals. With this method of micro conservation the containers full of seeds are protected individually, in such a way that, even if there are variations in the outside atmosphere, inside the container the humidity conditions are constant.

Humidity control via micro conservation in Eppendorf tubes

Labelling the strains you have is even more vital if you cannot see the seeds. This can be the case if, for example, you follow the advice of some growers, who instruct more inexperienced growers to store their seeds in analogue film tubes. In cases like this you can simply stick a small label on it and jot down with a pencil the name of the strain in each tube, which should be placed, in turn, inside a piece of Tupperware to prevent its contents from deteriorating.

If you do not have any of these containers, you can always use some opaque and airtight plastic bottles, which will also do the trick. Inside, along with seeds, it is a good idea to place some dry rice or silica crystals, separated from them by means of a cotton ball or paper. These elements will absorb moisture from the atmosphere, which, depending on one’s location, can be around 25% or higher.

To keep your seeds in a cool place you’ll only have to make some space for them in your refrigerator at home (if it is a no-frost model, and in the fruits and vegetables crisper, even better), though ensuring that it is dry enough for their proper preservation will be a bit more complicated.