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planting a marijuana seed in soil

The best choice of soil for marijuana seeds is a light mix. The light mix does not have a high concentration of nutrients, which can be detrimental to a seedling’s health. Young plants do not need as many nutrients as mature ones.

Now that you know how to plant cannabis seeds in four easy steps, you might still have some questions about the details. Here is a list of frequently asked questions to answer some you might have:

Some seeds may be tricky to plant and grow, but you do not need much regarding cannabis seeds. You will notice that many of the tools are already in your home. If you need to get any additional items, you can find them in a regular store or garden center. The list of equipment includes:

What Soil to Plant Weed Seeds In?

It is important not to add extra nutrients to the soil to keep the plant healthy. The potting soil already comes with the necessary amount of minerals a cannabis seedling needs to grow. The young plant is vulnerable to a nutrient burn, which causes leaves to lose the meat it requires and turn brown or yellow

Try not to cover the pots with plastic or create a humidity dome over them. Air needs to pass through easily, and a buildup of humidity may damage the plant. Besides avoiding the wrong soil, make sure it is not too wet or too dry. Whenever you water the seedling, make sure it does not have the wrong pH level.

Weed seeds can grow indoors or outside, but growers need to pay attention to the time of year before planting outdoors. Cold temperatures can kill a cannabis plant, so you will need to place it outside as soon as winter ends. The recommended period is between April and mid-May. Seedlings require the entire growth cycle before temperatures drop again.

The positioning can help the top of the plant and its roots grow out correctly. The stem could bend and not develop properly, and the roots might sprout upward. The weed seedling might not turn into a healthy adult plant.

Start by filling pots with a premium-quality soil that has been soaked in water. Many growers also choose to lace the water with a root stimulator. Make a hole roughly 10–15mm deep. This will be your seed’s new home. Remove the seeds from their packet and place them into the pre-dug holes. Loosely cover the seeds, but be careful not to compress the soil above the seed too much. The root will struggle to penetrate solid soil, slowing plant growth. Lightly spray the top of where you placed the seed so that your growing medium stays moist.

Probably one of the most common methods of germination. The kitchen towel method comes in several iterations. Some growers use cotton wool pads or absorbent pieces of paper. For this guide, we will be using kitchen towel as it is readily available and holds moisture relatively well.

Timescales can vary, as it all depends on how ideal your germination environment is (see the golden rules above). Even the worst grower could make a seed germinate, but it may take a few weeks and, of course, increases the risk of a weaker plant.

WET KITCHEN TOWEL METHOD

Planting directly into your growing medium prevents having to move seeds when they are at their most fragile. That first root tip is covered with microscopic filaments that are easily damaged. Given that both a cup full of water and moist paper towels are more prone to temperature fluctuations from their environment, planting in soil is a much safer option.

Your growing pots will need to be placed in a damp climate that is within the temperature range listed under our golden rules. After 4–10 days, you should see a young seedling sprout, while the roots will have begun to develop underneath the soil. The entire plant and its soil can now be transferred to a larger pot, where normal growing routines should start.

Maintaining the ideal temperature (between 22–25°C/71–77°F) and moisture for germination is tricky. Leaving seeds out in the open environment or on a windowsill is far from ideal; a DIY climate-controlled cupboard would do a much better service. A warming mat is perfect for maintaining a constant temperature, but it doesn’t tackle the issue of moisture.

The soil pots will need small holes (roughly 10–15mm deep) for the newly germinated seeds to be placed into. Once the seeds are secure, you will want to place a fluorescent light 13–15cm (5–6 inches) away to encourage growth. Finally, don’t risk overwatering your seeds at this early stage. Use a plant mister to make sure they stay damp but not soaking wet.

Soil is an easy, more natural method with which to germinate your cannabis seeds. The soil protects the fragile roots from any interference, and soil is, after all, where a cannabis plant would grow in the wild.

The paper towel method also has its risk, as the fragile seedlings can be damaged during the potting process. The tiny roots can also get tangled in the paper towels, so make sure to move the seeds to potting soil before roots grow too long. Use your hands or tweezers to gently remove each seed from the paper towels and place them in a prepared growing medium.

How to germinate cannabis seeds

The environment in which seeds germinate also plays a role in the outcome. While there are several different germination methods, each requires proper moisture, minimal handling, and warm springtime temperatures between 68-72 degrees Fahrenheit.

It’s essential to acquire high-quality cannabis seeds for germination, as these will go on to become high-quality cannabis plants. Seeds that are fresh-feeling or too green indicate that they haven’t reached full maturity, while pale-green, white, or very dark cannabis seeds may have trouble sprouting. However, it’s tricky to know the outcome of a popped seed, so trying may be worthwhile. If you’re not ready to pop your seeds yet, store them in a dark, cool place until it’s time for germination.

When the seedling stems reach two to four inches in height, it’s time to transplant your cannabis into larger pots with more room for roots to spread down and out. After you’ve done this, you’ve successfully germinated your cannabis seeds into proper, young plants.