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how to preserve marijuana seeds

Once you have received your ordered cannabis seeds, most growers start their grow right away. After all, your seeds are fresh, and you want to prevent the cannabis seeds from germinating in an uncontrolled way. However, if you can not or do not want to start with your cultivation immediately, it is important to store the seeds properly.

The best way to temporarily store weed seeds (several days, weeks or months) is to place the seeds in a dark, lockable (plastic) container in the refrigerator.

How to store weed seeds?

Note: seeds that are stored in the freezer should be germinated immediately after you take the seeds out of the freezer. Do not let the seeds thaw first.

To prevent unused cannabis seeds from germinating or getting damaged, you have to store weed seeds in a cool, dark and moisture-free place.

Of course, it’s also possible that you have bought several cannabis seeds and that you want to keep a part for, for example, next year. The best way to store cannabis seeds for a long term is to freeze the seeds. Make sure you vacuum pack the seeds, place the seeds in a dark lockable (plastic) container and put them in the freezer. If done right, you can store your seeds for years.

Humidity is easily one of the biggest threats to your seeds. Here is how different levels of humidity (% relative humidity) affect your cannabis seeds:

Many people forget this, but it’s true—your cannabis seeds are living organisms. Before they germinate, however, they are in a state of rest (much like some animals when they hibernate). And like all living things, seeds can die. When storing your seeds, you’ll want to give them the optimal conditions to ensure they hold through until you’re ready to germinate and plant them.

EFFECTS OF HUMIDITY ON CANNABIS SEEDS

For long-term storage, it’s best to keep your seeds in a sealed container inside the fridge. Remember that opening the door of your fridge can actually cause some pretty dramatic temperature shifts. If you happen to have a second fridge that gets used less often than the one in your kitchen, use that one to store your seeds.

Again, whenever possible, keep your seeds in their original packaging. If you do open a pack of seeds and have leftovers, transfer the extra seeds directly into a sealed airtight container.

If your seeds get exposed to light or rapid changes in temperature, these conditions will trigger them to use up their nutrient stores before they ever see soil, meaning they won’t have the nutrients they need to germinate. High humidity, on the other hand, can trigger fungi to grow on your seeds.

Tip: When storing seeds in the fridge or freezer you can add silica gel sachets to ensure they’re completely dry.

There are three main factors that can affect seeds in a bad way:

As we’re dealing with nature, you need to keep certain conditions or this can have an impact. Even though seeds have a hard shell and are fairly robust, you should have the following points in mind to avoid any kind of problems in the future.

6. Storing Seeds For Years

High humidity can trigger fungi to grow on your seeds. If your seeds get exposed to light or rapid changes in temperature it will trigger them to use up their nutrient stores before they ever see soil, meaning they won’t have the nutrients they need to germinate.

You can still store them in a fridge, it depends on what you prefer and what options you have available. Ideally, you want to store your seeds in a cool, dark, and dry place.

If you’re storing your seeds for a couple of months it’s better if you store them in the refrigerator. This will guarantee the seeds don’t suffer from temperature swings. By keeping them in their original package or in a light-proof container you ensure they will be good for as long as you need.

We recommend storing them in the vegetable drawer or far back in the refrigerator and using a small cooler or something similar so the temperature doesn’t oscillate when opening the fridge door or if the power goes out.