Posted on

from the seeds

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 2

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Definition of seed (Entry 2 of 2)

First Known Use of seed

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word ‘seed.’ Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Keep scrolling for more

Cede means “to yield or grant typically by treaty.” Most of the verb senses of seed are concerned with planting seeds (either literal, as of plants, or figuratively, as of ideas). However, the word may also be used to mean “to schedule (tournament players or teams) so that superior ones will not meet in early rounds.” If you relinquish or yield something you are ceding it, and if you are organizing the participants in a tournament you are seeding them.

Middle English, from Old English sǣd; akin to Old High German sāt seed, Old English sāwan to sow — more at sow

The seeds lying in the deep freeze of the vault include wild and old varieties, many of which are not in general use anymore. And many don’t exist outside of the seed collections they came from. But the genetic diversity contained in the vault could provide the DNA traits needed to develop new strains for whatever challenges the world or a particular region will face in the future.One of the 200,000 varieties of rice within the vault could have the trait needed to adapt rice to higher temperatures, for example, or to find resistance to a new pest or disease. This is particularly important with the challenges of climate change. “Not too many think about crop diversity as being so fundamentally important, but it is. It is almost as important as water and air,” says Haga. “Seeds generally are the basis for everything. Not only what we eat, but what we wear, nature all about us.”

The Global Seed Vault has been dubbed the “doomsday” vault, which conjures up an image of a reserve of seeds for use in case of an apocalyptic event or a global catastrophe. But it is the much smaller, localized destruction and threats facing gene banks all over the world that the vault was designed to protect against—and it’s why the vault was opened in February, when TIME visited.

Deep in the bowels of an icy mountain on an island above the Arctic Circle between Norway and the North Pole lies a resource of vital importance for the future of human­kind. It’s not coal, oil or precious minerals, but seeds.

Over the past 50 years, agricultural practices have changed dramatically, with technological advances allowing large-scale crop production. But while crop yields have increased, biodiversity has decreased to the point that now only about 30 crops provide 95% of human food-energy needs. Only 10% of the rice varieties that China used in the 1950s are still used today, for example. The U.S. has lost over 90% of its fruit and vegetable varieties since the 1900s. This monoculture nature of agriculture leaves food supplies more susceptible to threats such as diseases and drought.

As the siege dragged on, a number of them eventually died from starvation. Despite being surrounded by seeds and plant material, they steadfastly refused to save themselves by eating any of it, such was their conviction about the importance of the seeds to aid Russia’s recovery after war and to help protect the future of humankind. One of the scientists, Dmitri Ivanov, is said to have died surrounded by bags of rice.

Millions of these tiny brown specks, from more than 930,000 varieties of food crops, are stored in the Global Seed Vault on Spitsbergen, part of Norway’s Svalbard archipelago. It is essentially a huge safety deposit box, holding the world’s largest collection of agricultural biodiversity. “Inside this building is 13,000 years of agricultural history,” says Brian Lainoff, lead partnerships coordinator of the Crop Trust, which manages the vault, as he hauls open the huge steel door leading inside the mountain.

The entrance leads to a small tunnel-like room filled with the loud whirring noise of electricity and cooling systems required to keep the temperature within the vault consistent. Through one door is a wide concrete tunnel illuminated by strip lighting leading 430 ft. down into the mountain. At the end of this corridor is a chamber, an added layer of security to protect the vaults containing the seeds.

Dare mo ga tane o maite iru n da mirai e
Doko de dō yatte saku ka nante shiranai keredo
Utsukushī dake ja dame na no
Yogorete mo kagayaku yō yatte kita koto wa tashika da
Me o dashite donto rettmi daun

やってきた事は確かだ
運命よ ドントレットミーダウン

[FULLバージョン]

We currently do not have these lyrics in English. If you would like to submit them, please use the form below.

Bukiyō na watashi ni totte ippo wa daiji
Kabosoi te de mo kiseki o okosu no yo

Tatoeba kurayami ni nomikomareta tte
Kanarazu megurimegutte hi ga sasu yo

誰もが種を蒔いているんだ 未来へ
どこでどうやって咲くかなんて知らないけれど
美しいだけじゃ駄目なの
汚れても輝く様 やってきた事は確かだ
芽を出して ドントレットミーダウン

Romaji