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When you’ve decided which strain to grow, do a bit of research to familiarize yourself with the unique cultivation needs of that strain. While there are general guidelines for growing any type of cannabis, each strain has its own specific needs. Some strains do better in specific parts of the world or climates. Growing a strain that is well-suited to your climate will make it easier on you and the plants while giving you better odds of a successful harvest. If you aren’t certain what strain you want to grow, you can always give mixed packs of seeds a try, though it may be difficult to replicate any successes.

Marijuana seeds are now easier than ever to find and purchase. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Which marijuana strain?

Many cannabis consumers like the idea of growing marijuana on their own — whether it’s recreational weed or medical marijuana. People often find it incredibly rewarding to smoke buds from their own marijuana plants, and many enjoy being able to nurture plants all the way from cannabis seed to final harvest. Growing marijuana can be accomplished by either starting with cannabis clones or by sprouting and planting cannabis seeds.

Once you’ve figured out which seeds are right for you, you need to decide how many seeds to purchase. Regardless of the strain or type of seed, you should have an idea of how many plants you want to grow. It’s also a good idea to circle back to your area’s laws and check the number of plants you’re legally allowed to grow.

There is a seemingly endless variety of cannabis strains now in existence. Before buying cannabis seeds you need to know what kind of weed you want to grow. Start by figuring out if you want to grow an indica-dominant, sativa-dominant, or hybrid strain. Indica-dominant plants tend to be short and bushy with thick stems and broad, deep-green leaves. They also have short flowering cycles and grow well in cold climates with short growing seasons. Sativa plants have longer flowering cycles, fare better in warm climates with long seasons, and usually grow taller with light-green, narrow leaves.

Make sure to always stay within your state’s legal limit of growing plants.

You can also do some research and find an online grow journal that details the whole growing process of a specific strain from a particular breeder. Through these, you’ll be able to look over another grower’s specific notes and see pictures of the final results.

Cannabis seeds usually come in a pack of 10 or 12 seeds and start at around $40 a pack and go up from there. Some high-end genetics can run between $200 to $500 a pack.

How many seeds should I buy? Are they all going to survive?

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If you want six total cannabis plants to harvest for buds and are growing from regular seeds, start with about 4 times as many, or 24 seeds. Some won’t germinate and some will turn out to be males, and then you’ll want to discard down to the six best phenotypes. If growing feminized seeds, you can probably start with about twice as many seeds in this case (about 12); a couple won’t germinate, and then discard down to the six best phenotypes.

If you buy a packet of regular seeds, they’ll come with a mix of males and females. A lot of cultivators prefer to grow these because they haven’t been backcrossed—essentially inbred—as much as feminized or autoflower seeds. You’ll need to sex out the seeds once their reproductive organs show during the flowering phase and discard the males—because they don’t produce buds and will pollenate females, resulting in seeded flowers.

When growing regular seeds, some won’t germinate and some will have to be discarded because they’ll turn out to be males. With feminized seeds, some won’t germinate, but a higher percentage of them will turn into flowering plants because there won’t be any males.

If the male is not removed in a timely fashion your female plants could become pollinated and start growing seeds. These seeds are part of the natural process and can be used to start a new grow. Careful, 50% of them will be males! Did you also know that cannabis seeds are a superfood? You can survive by eating just seeds!

Want to see what we are growing at the Grobo office? Check out this video to see what strains we have!

Why This Matters

The term sinsemilla is derived from the Spanish words “sin” (meaning “without”) and “semilla” (meaning “seed”) to mean as stated, without seed. This word has been associated with seedless cannabis flower since the 1970’s in North America but there is some evidence of it dating back further to countries like India! To clear up a few myths; sinsemilla is NOT a strain or genetics. It is a female cannabis plant that has not been exposed to male plants (aka not fertilized).

This seedy weed could mean that the grower didn’t properly identify the male plants. Most growers will remove these plants immediately to ensure that their female plants are not pollinated.

If you are growing cannabis and are here to figure out if you have a male, female or a potential hermaphrodite: we want to introduce you to “ nanners ” which is a tell tale sign that pollination has taken place. Check out this article about how soon you can tell the sex of your cannabis plant.