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female indica plant

Branches grow out of the main stem and support fan leaves and buds. Growers often train a cannabis plant by topping branches to create more bud sites.

Males are important in the breeding process, but that is generally best left to expert breeders. When pollinating females, males provide half of the genetic makeup inherited by seeds.

Cotyledon leaves

Males and females are usually only pollinated when crossbreeding plants or creating new strains.

The cannabis plant has several structures, many of which we can find on any ordinary flowering plant species. Cannabis grows on long skinny stems with its large, iconic fan leaves extending out from areas called nodes.

Cannabis really stands out in its flowers—or buds—where unique and intricate formations occur: fiery orange hairs, sugary crystals, and chunky buds enveloped by tiny leaves.

Marijuana (cannabis sativa sp.) is a dioecious or unisexual plant, what means that it produces male and female flowers in different individuals, although we can find both types of flowers in hermaphrodite plants. We call males those plants that produce male flowers, and females those producing female flowers.

Brandon 2018-03-18
I just transplanted my plant not sure if it is female its two . weeks but .. I planted only 4 seeds .. Since I moved to plant to 65% nitrogen. The other 35% is compost .. .,I see 6 plants growing but some small . I,only,planted 4 .. Or 5 .. Ik it wasn’t 6,. . I believe the females love that combo if its females

When to determine the sex of marijuana plants?

CWW 2021-07-22
I sent some pictures to the email address. Hoping someone can help tell me if it is male or female soon. Thanks.

4viii 2020-04-13
I don’t know how to distinguish between male and female plant.. and when it is the time to use?

Marijuana males flower producing small bell-shaped clusters, that hang down and open releasing the pollen, while females produce tear-shaped calyxes with two pistils – usually white – that group together forming what we call buds.

French naturalist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, the first European botanist to classify this type in 1785, received his samples from India and dubbed the plant Cannabis Indica in recognition of that fact.

In the flowering phase, upward and outward growth slows considerably and may appear to cease completely as Cannabis Indica directs the bulk of its energy to growing reproductive parts – male flowers which distribute pollen, or female flowers which produce the majority of cannabinoids and are meant to receive pollen and produce seeds. If male plants are eliminated early in the flowering phase, female plants are prevented from making seeds and their cannabinoid-rich flowers (also referred to as buds, tops or colas) may be harvested for recreational and medicinal use.

Cannabis Indica L. is generally agreed to have originated either on the Asian subcontinent, or possibly in Afghanistan.

The typical example of Cannabis Indica is a more compact, thick-stemmed bush than its cousins, usually reaching a height of less than two metres. The foliage is generally a dark shade of green, some examples appearing to have almost blue or green-black leaves. These leaves are composed of short, wide blades.

The life cycle of Cannabis Indica, like the rest of the Cannabis genus, is divided into two distinct phases – vegetation and flowering – which are reactions to different day-lengths (photoperiods). Vegetation is also sometimes referred to simply as the growth, or growing, period, although the plant continues to grow in size and mass throughout the flowering period as well.

Indica strains tend to produce more side-branches and denser overall growth than Sativas, resulting in wider, bushier plants. Indica flowers form in thick clusters around the nodes of the female plant (the points at which pairs of leaves grow from the stem and branches). They usually weigh more than Sativa flowers of similar size, as they are more solid.