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buds with seeds in them

Take a look at your seed and make sure it’s the right color. It should be brown and entirely whole, not split apart or otherwise damaged.

It does seem rather odd, considering the prolific nature of the marijuana leaf in stoner culture – we even have images stretching back thousands of years, documented in ancient texts, of the marijuana leaf.

EDITOR’S CHOICE – ILoveGrowingMarijuana

You’re preparing your bud, getting ready to grind it down, and you lift it up a bit to admire its color and… what’s that? A little speck, either green or brown, sitting right in your bud! Are my buds bad?

This gravel helps provide a good base for the soil, as well as providing drainage.

During this process, it’s possible that the seeds might suffer damage and not be entirely usable. It’s possible that, after putting that time and use of your valuable plates into trying to germinate your seeds, none of them will bloom.

This doesn’t mean it is bad for your health but we advise against smoking seeds. Please remove them as you see them – you may find them crushed up in your grinder! The presence of seeds does mean that the total mass of smokable weed is compromised with decreased cannabinoid content and quite a few unwanted seeds. Think about it this way: If you purchase an ounce of cannabis and it comes filled with seeds, you are paying for the seeds which are less desirable than the cannabis flower that you were expecting.

This seedy weed could mean that the grower didn’t properly identify the male plants. Most growers will remove these plants immediately to ensure that their female plants are not pollinated.

Why This Matters

High-quality weed is important when you invest your hard earned money in what you smoke. There are a handful of things that can decrease your bud quality, one of which is finding seeds in your weed.

Low quality pot won’t give you the high you want, but it might give you a headache and some sleepy vibes. This usually has a lot of stems in it, leaves, and even seeds . If you notice that the weight of the weed you’re purchasing is more than you expected it’s not because your dealer is your friend. it’s probably because you have low quality weed with seeds.

Growing from home allows you to control many factors, so you can expect higher quality cannabis. If you are able to grow indoors, theres an even lower chance of your cannabis plants getting fertilized, as you would have to have the males in the tent/ grow box with them! When using a Grobo, you never have to worry about male plants being too close to your females.

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed, but overall results seem to be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and often either the yields or quality isn’t as expected. The problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder, where each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency they’re supposed to.

There’s a seed in my bud!

If it’s very seedy the buds may not feel as potent, though a few seeds here and there won’t make much difference in potency. The main problem with seedy weed is that you are getting less smokeable bud for the amount of total mass there. If it is seedless, you will get a lot more bang for your buck. Seedless bud (sinsemilla) is considered to be the highest quality and most potent type of weed.

Are seeds good to grow?

What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about?

Seeds are the result of pollination. That means the seedy cannabis buds (which come from a female plant) may have come into contact with pollen from a male plant. Therefore, it’s possible the grower didn’t identify and remove all the male plants before the released pollen. It’s also possible that the plant self-pollinated (sometimes called herming) which is often the result of plant stress during the budding phase but can also be caused by genetics.

It should be dark and relatively hard. Very pale or white seeds, that can be easily crushed between the fingers, usually won’t sprout. However, I have been surprised to find some very flimsy seeds sprout and produce amazing plants (we aren’t breeding them for hard seeds after all) so when in doubt, I highly recommend doing the true test to see if the seed is viable – try to germinate the seed and see if it sprouts!